PICTURESQUE WINDOW:
A Window Picture Frame

 

 

As many of you may know from my Storytelling Fireplace, it took me weeks to figure out how to arrange the treasures on our fireplace mantel. One piece in particular that seems to capture attention is our black and white window frame photograph. The size of the photograph in addition to its classic black and white charm is what makes it a statement piece on the mantel. My husband and I were dancing at our close friends wedding when the photographers sneakily snapped this photo of us. This picture is near and dear to my heart and I am forever thankful to those photographers for having captured this moment. People say a picture is worth a thousand words and I am inclined to believe them, for this one says everything about us and our marriage. πŸ™‚

 

After having several people ask me how I printed out this picture, I decided to write a tutorial on how to enlarge and print a photo to fit seamlessly into a window picture frame. In the tutorial below, you will find instructions for four different software programs in which you can use to accomplish this task. Let’s get started!

 

Materials

Window Picture Frame

Printer Paper or Photo Paper

Photograph

Printer

Scissors

Ruler

 

Software (Choose One)

Adobe Illustrator

Adobe Photoshop

Microsoft Word

Microsoft PowerPoint

 

Photo Prep

First, select the photograph you wish to display in the frame – this is the always the hardest part in my opinion! I recommend using a digital file of your selected photograph for optimum quality. If all you have is a physical photograph, simply scan the picture and save as a file on your computer. When scanning your photograph use a minimum of 300 dpi. Remove the back panels of the frame and use a ruler to measure the individual panel sizes as well as the width of the frame margins between each panel. After a few trial and errors, I discovered the frame margins have to be accounted for; meaning the portions of the picture that fall at those margins will not be visible – refer to Diagram 01. My frame has awkward measurements because it was made for 4 x 6 photos with excess glass surrounding each photo; therefore, my measurements are 6 x 7 Β½ with ½” frame margin.

 

Adobe Illustrator or Adobe Photoshop

The process for enlarging and printing the photograph is the same for either Adobe Illustrator or Adobe Photoshop. Begin by starting a new file and set your artboard or canvas size to include all of the photo panels and frame margins.

 

Example:

Photo Panel Size: 6” x 7 ½”

Frame Margin Width: ½”

Artboard/Canvas Width: 15 ½”   (7 ½” + ½” + 7 ½”)

Artboard/Canvas Height: 19”   (6” + ½” + 6” + ½” + 6”)

 

Next, refer to Diagram 01 below and place guides to divide each space according to your measurements. Go to View – Rulers – Show Rulers and place guides by clicking and dragging the ruler onto your workspace. Go to File – Place and insert the selected photograph into the file. Scale the photo to fit the entire artboard or canvas. Your photo may have to be cropped some to fit depending on the frame dimensions. Refer to Diagram 02 below and crop down the artboard or canvas to one of the photo panels. Print the cropped image to actual size on the appropriate page size you are printing at (8.5 x 11, 4 x 6, etc). Undo the cropping to revert back to the original artboard or canvas size. Repeat the crop, print, and undo steps for each photo panel.

 

Diagram 01: Set Guides to Measurements

 

Diagram 02: Crop and Print Each Panel

 

Microsoft PowerPoint or Microsoft Word

The process for enlarging and printing the photograph is roughly the same for either Microsoft PowerPoint or Microsoft Word; Microsoft Word requires a couple of extra steps. Begin by starting a new file and set your page size to include all of the photo panels and frame margins. To adjust the page size, go to File – Page Setup and set a custom page size with no margins. Ignore any messages saying the page size exceeds printable areas; we will be cropping the images down to fit. Press OK to continue with the custom page size.

Β 

Example:

Photo Panel Size: 6” x 7 ½”

Frame Margin Width: ½”

Artboard/Canvas Width: 15 ½”     (7 ½” + ½” + 7 ½”)

Artboard/Canvas Height: 19”   (6” + ½” + 6” + ½” + 6”)

 

Next, refer to Diagram 01 below and place guides to divide each space according to your measurements. PowerPoint: Go to View – Guides – Static Guides and add new guides by holding Option (Mac) or Ctrl (Windows) while clicking and dragging the existing guides. Word: Go to View – Publishing Layout and add new guides by clicking and dragging the ruler onto your page. Draw lines over the guides and set their wrapping to be in front of text. Return to View – Print Layout.

 

Go to Insert – Picture (From File) and insert the selected photograph into the file. Scale the photo to fit the entire page. Your photo may have to be cropped some to fit depending on the frame dimensions. Refer to Diagram 02 below and crop down the photo to one of the photo panels. Open a new file with the appropriate page size you are printing at (8.5 x 11, 4 x 6, etc). Drag the cropped image into the new file and print from here. Undo the cropping in the original file to revert back to the original page size. Repeat the crop, print, and undo steps for each photo panel.

 

Assembly

Trim off any excess paper around each photo and place them into the frame. Remember to clean the glass before filling in your frame with photos – you don’t want any pesky smudges! Display your beautiful window frame and reminisce in those captured sweet moments of life. πŸ™‚

 

 

What did you think of this tutorial? Have any questions? Let us know below!

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2 Comments

  1. I so want a picture window of my sons wedding, but it scares me to try it!

    • That would be such a beautiful moment for this project! Congratulations to your son! You should try it! It is not too difficult and if you have any questions please feel free to contact me at thenavyhome@gmail.com. πŸ™‚ I would love to see it when you’re done!


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